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10 tips for enterprise integration with Logic Apps

 

Posted on Thursday, June 8, 2017 3:11 PM

Toon Vanhoutte by Toon Vanhoutte

This post contains 10 useful tips for designing enterprise integration solutions on top of Logic Apps. It's important to think upfront about reusability, reliability, security, error handling and maintenance.

Democratization of integration

Before we dive into the details, I want to provide some reasoning behind this post. With the rise of cloud technology, integration takes a more prominent role than ever before. In Microsoft's integration vision, democratization of integration is on top of the list.

Microsoft aims to take integration out of its niche market and offers it as an intuitive and easy-to-use service to everyone. The so-called Citizen Integrators are now capable of creating light-weight integrations without the steep learning curve that for example BizTalk Server requires. Such integrations are typically point-to-point, user-centric and have some accepted level of fault tolerance.

As an Integration Expert, you must be aware of this. Enterprise integration faces completely different requirements than light-weight citizen integration: loosely coupling is required, no message loss is accepted because it's mission critical interfacing, integrations must be optimized for operations personnel (monitoring and error handling), etc…

Keep this in mind when designing Logic App solutions for enterprise integration! Make sure you know your cloud and integration patterns. Ensure you understand the strengths and limits of Logic Apps. The advice below can give you a jump start in designing reliable interfaces within Logic Apps!

Design enterprise integration solutions

1. Decouple protocol and message processing

Once you created a Logic App that receives a message via a specific transport protocol, it's extremely difficult to change the protocol afterwards. This is because the subsequent actions of your Logic App often have a hard dependency on your protocol trigger / action. The advice is to perform the protocol handling in one Logic App and hand over the message to another Logic App to perform the message processing. This decoupling will allow you to change the receiving transport protocol in a flexible way, in case the requirements change or in case a certain protocol (e.g. SFTP) is not available in your DEV / TEST environment.

2. Establish reliable messaging

You must realize that every action you execute, is performed by an underlying HTTP connection. By its nature, an HTTP request/response is not reliable: the service is not aware if the client disconnects during request processing. That's why receiving messages must always happen in two phases: first you mark the data as returned by the service; second you label the data as received by the client (in our case the Logic App). The Service Bus Peek-Lock pattern is a great example that provides such at-least-once reliability.  Another example can be found here.

3. Design for reuse

Real enterprise integration is composed of several common integration tasks such as: receive, decode, transform, debatch, batch, enrich, send, etc… In many cases, each task is performed by a combination of several Logic App actions. To avoid reconfiguring these tasks over and over again, you need to design the solution upfront to encourage reuse of these common integration tasks. You can for example use the Process Manager pattern that orchestrates the message processing by reusing nested Logic Apps or introduce the Routing Slip pattern to build integration on top of generic Logic Apps. Reuse can also be achieved on the deployment side, by having some kind of templated deployments of reusable integration tasks.

4. Secure your Logic Apps

From a security perspective, you need to take into account both role-based access control to your Logic App resources and runtime security considerations. RBAC can be configured in the Access Control (IAM) tab of your Logic App or on a Resource Group level. The runtime security really depends on the triggers and actions you're using. As an example: Request endpoints are secured via a Shared Access Signature that must be part of the URL, IP restrictions can be applied. Azure API Management is the way to go if you want to govern API security centrally, on a larger scale. It's a good practice to assign the minimum required privileges (e.g. read only) to your Logic Apps.

5. Think about idempotence

Logic Apps can be considered as composite services, built on top of several API's. API's leverage the HTTP protocol, which can cause data consistency issues due to its nature. As described in this blog, there are multiple ways the client and server can get misaligned about the processing state. In such situations, clients will mostly retry automatically, which could result in the same data being processed twice at server side. Idempotent service endpoints are required in such scenarios, to avoid duplicate data entries. Logic Apps connectors that provide Upsert functionality are very helpful in these cases.

6. Have a clear error handling strategy

With the rise of cloud technology, exception and error handling become even more important. You need to cope with failure when connecting to multiple on premise systems and cloud services. With Logic Apps, retry policies are your first resort to build resilient integrations. You can configure a retry count and interval at every action, there's no support for exponential retries or circuit breaker pattern. In case the retry policy doesn't solve the issue, it's advised to return a clear error description within sync integrations and to ensure a resumable workflow within async integrations. Read here how you can design a good resume / resubmit strategy.

7. Ensure decent monitoring

Every IT solution benefits from a good monitoring. It provides visibility and improves the operational experience for your support personnel. If you want to expose business properties within your monitoring, you can use Logic Apps custom outputs or tracked properties. These can be consumed via the Logic Apps Workflow Management API or via OMS Log Analytics. From an operational perspective, it's important to be aware that there is an out-of-the-box alerting mechanism that can send emails or trigger Logic Apps in case a run fails. Unfortunately, Logic Apps has no built-in support for Application Insights, but you can leverage extensibility (custom API App or Azure Function) to achieve this. If your integration spans multiple Logic Apps, you must foresee correlation in your monitoring / tracing!  Find here more details about monitoring in Logic Apps.

8. Use async wherever possible

Solid integrations are often characterized by asynchronous messaging. Unless the business requirements really demand request/response patterns, try to implement them asynchronously. It comes with the advantage that you introduce real decoupling, both from a design and runtime perspective. Introducing a queuing system (e.g. Azure Service Bus) in fire-and-forget integrations, results in highly scalable solutions that can handle an enormous amount of messages. Retry policies in Logic Apps must have different settings depending whether you're dealing with async or sync integration. Read more about it here.

9. Don't forget your integration patterns

Whereas BizTalk Server forces you to design and develop in specific integration patterns, Logic Apps is more intuitive and easier to use. This could come with a potential downside that you forget about integration patterns, because they are not suggested by the service itself. As an integration expert, it's your duty to determine which integration patterns should be applied on your interfaces. Loosely coupling is common for enterprise integration. You can for example introduce Azure Service Bus that provides a Publish/Subscribe architecture. Its message size limitation can be worked around by leveraging the Claim Check pattern, with Azure Blob Storage. This is just one example of introducing enterprise integration patterns.

10. Apply application lifecycle management (ALM)

The move to a PaaS architecture, should be done carefully and must be governed well, as described here. Developers should not have full access to the production resources within the Azure portal, because the change of one small setting can have an enormous impact. Therefore, it's very important to setup ALM, to deploy your Logic App solutions throughout the DTAP-street. This ensures uniformity and avoids human deployment errors. Check this video to get a head start on continuous integration for Logic Apps and read this blog on how to use Azure Key Vault to retrieve passwords within ARM deployments. Consider ALM as an important aspect within your disaster recovery strategy!

Conclusion

Yes, we can! Logic Apps really is a fit for enterprise integration, if you know what you're doing! Make sure you know your cloud and integration patterns. Ensure you understand the strengths and limits of Logic Apps. The Logic App framework is a truly amazing and stable platform that brings a whole range of new opportunities to organizations. The way you use it, should be depending on the type of integration you are facing!

Interested in more?  Definitely check out this session about building loosely coupled integrations with Logic Apps!

Any questions or doubts? Do not hesitate to get in touch!
Toon

Categories: Azure
Tags: Logic Apps
written by: Toon Vanhoutte